Europe 20 years after the Fall of the Wall

The epoch defining period of 1989 became the annual theme of the school year 2009/2010 at the European School Munich. Students, teachers, parents and friends met protagonists of that era: witnesses, politicians, writers, historians and journalists from Germany and across Europe. The aim was to enable both primary and Secondary School students to experience the extent to which our continent has changed since. To achieve this, the theme was covered in class, in various projects and workshops. In addition, readings, concerts, performances discussions and exhibitions were held at the ESM. This project quite deliberately focused on Eastern Europe and was - naturally - multilingual and multicultural! Many cooperation partners supported the project, which was carried out under the auspices of the Mayor of Munich, Christian Ude.

Several exhibitions were on display during the project. The “Peaceful Revolution in the GDR and German Unification” of Berlin's “Federal Foundation for the Reclaiming of History” in October 2009; "Ordinary Heroes: Individual Stories of Imprisoned Dissidents in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) and the People's Republic of Poland during the Cold War” as a documentary of a German-Polish school project in December 2009; “It all started in Gdansk” as evidence of the solidarity with the Polish trade unionists in February 2010; “Beyond the Wall” depicting memorable snapshots, in which the Italian photographer Augusto Bordato captured the social changes of the 1989s, in May 2010.

The various visitors included a cross-section of well-known Europeans from various fields, encompassing culture, science, politics and religion. Writers included Peter Schneider, Klaus Kordon and Holly-Jane Rahlens from Berlin, Sylvie Germain from Paris, the journalist Karl-Heinz Baum from Berlin, Erhard Stackl from Vienna, Demetrio Volcic from Trieste and Andreas Oplatka from Budapest. Other contributors were the British musicologist David Buckley from Liverpool and the historian Tilo Schabert from Munich, Alonso Alvarez de Toledo from Madrid, the last East German ambassadors of Spain and later Chief of Protocol of King Juan Carlos, Ibon Zubiaur, the Director of the Instituto Cervantes in Munich, and the Greek Orthodox Metropolitan Augoustinos of Germany with the Jesuit priest and filmmaker Christof Wolf.

Prelude

The project kicked off on the 13th October 2009 when two renowned journalists paid a visit to the school. Karl-Heinz Baum - who had been East German correspondent for the "Frankfurter Rundschau" newspaper between 1977 and 1990 - recalled the events of the fateful night when the Wall fell. He talked about his own experiences and presented many exciting details about the GDR's period of disintegration to an attentive audience consisting of Secondary School students. In addition, he answered one student's question on what he personally liked about the divided second half of Germany with a disarming declaration: "Of course, the wonderful women! I myself had fallen in love with one lady at that time and we are still inseparable!"

In the Primary School, he held a discussion with year five Primary School pupils and was absolutely amazed by the ease and eagerness with which the young audience asked him about "the greatest experience of my life". In the afternoon, the Austrian journalist Erhard Stackl of Vienna's newspaper "Standard" talked in the Europahalle about his book "1989 - The Fall of Dictatorships" and explained that Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Mikhail Gorbachev "glasnost" as well as the "perestroika", and last but not least, the Polish Pope John Paul II, had all contributed to the fall of the Iron Curtain

On the same day, the exhibition "Peaceful Revolution in the GDR and German Unification" of Berlin's "Federal Foundation for the Reclaiming of History" was inaugurated in the Europabau building. The attendees first had to pass a trellis symbolising the Berlin Wall before they could marvel at the artistically arranged poster exhibition on the first floor and at the comic stories' display on the ground floor. The two school libraries provided extensive support materials for both students and teachers. A large display case in front of the Secondary School's library showed the diversity of literature purchased o n the subject of the fall of the wall and represented an ultimate inspiration.

The project kicked off on the 13th October 2009 when two renowned journalists paid a visit to the school. Karl-Heinz Baum - who had been East German correspondent for the "Frankfurter Rundschau" newspaper between 1977 and 1990 - recalled the events of the fateful night when the Wall fell. He talked about his own experiences and presented many exciting details about the GDR's period of disintegration to an attentive audience consisting of Secondary School students. In addition, he answered one student's question on what he personally liked about the divided second half of Germany with a disarming declaration: "Of course, the wonderful women! I myself had fallen in love with one lady at that time and we are still inseparable!"

In the Primary School, he held a discussion with year five Primary School pupils and was absolutely amazed by the ease and eagerness with which the young audience asked him about "the greatest experience of my life". In the afternoon, the Austrian journalist Erhard Stackl of Vienna's newspaper "Standard" talked in the Europahalle about his book "1989 - The Fall of Dictatorships" and explained that Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Mikhail Gorbachev "glasnost" as well as the "perestroika", and last but not least, the Polish Pope John Paul II, had all contributed to the fall of the Iron Curtain

On the same day, the exhibition "Peaceful Revolution in the GDR and German Unification" of Berlin's "Federal Foundation for the Reclaiming of History" was inaugurated in the Europabau building. The attendees first had to pass a trellis symbolising the Berlin Wall before they could marvel at the artistically arranged poster exhibition on the first floor and at the comic stories' display on the ground floor. The two school libraries provided extensive support materials for both students and teachers. A large display case in front of the Secondary School's library showed the diversity of literature purchased o n the subject of the fall of the wall and represented an ultimate inspiration.

Between Rock ‘n’ Roll and Lipsi

On the 9th November 2009, our entire school commemorated the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. In the presence of hundreds of students as well as teaching staff, the "Wall" was symbolically stormed several times in the assembly halls of the secondary and Primary School. This symbolic event marked a key moment in the project, an article appearing in "Süddeutsche Zeitung" about it. Stony gray, but nonetheless impacting, cardboard bricks were erected in the middle of the Secondary School assembly hall. Dancers appeared on both sides of the "Wall"; dancing Rock 'n' Roll on the West side and on the East side competing in "Lipsi" dancing. The dancers on both sides then removed the bulwark. However, due to severe looking GDR border soldiers they were unable to find common ground initially, uniting finally when "Ode to Joy" was played. While there was plenty of noise during the first performance in the crowded assembly hall (probably like during the "real" downfall in 1989), everyone was quiet as a mouse during the second presentation, enabling also the student performers to savour the moment.

On the 1st December 2009, the exhibition of the Polish-German student project called "Ordinary Heroes" was then inaugurated. It was implemented and supported by Berlin's Association "Kannste auch e.V." and by the Foundation "Remembrance, Responsibility and Future" (Stiftung "Erinnerung, Verantwortung und Zukunft"). Gilbert Furian, a victim of the State Security Unit (STASI), had travelled from Berlin to impress the audience with the account of his "crimes". He was arrested on the charge of distributing an information booklet about punks in the GDR and was sentenced for two years in prison.

"Wall Jumper" - "Wallflower" - "Sunny Side"

On the 19th October 2009, the literature "marathon" - with Berlin authors giving readings - started with the German-American writer Holly-Jane Rahlens. Initially, she only wanted to read a few passages from her latest youth thriller "Wallflower", but turned this reading in front of 200 students expertly into an East-West relationship mini-drama with open-end and to the sound of imaginary squeaking S-Bahn tracks. She was rewarded with enthusiastic applause. On the 3rd December 2009, the well-known children's and youth book writer Klaus Kordon read from "On the Sunny Side", his most recent novel about the personally experienced nail-biting moments between division and unity. He delighted the audience with his personal commitment to combine autobiography and literature.

On the 10th December 2009, Peter Schneider presented "The Wall Jumper", which was considered a groundbreaking essay when it first appeared in 1982, to an audience of 150 students. A spokesman of the student movement - author of the cult book "Lenz" (1972) about the errors and confusions of the 1968s - suddenly dealt with the German question. A person from West Berlin dreamed of overcoming the wall that he could no longer bear. Being a German left-wing patriot, he did not want to leave this question for others to deal with, but created a literary link between Willy Brandt's "Ostpolitik" (Eastern policies) and the Wall. And the students noticed this! The author did not go through the same - albeit skilful - routine of a book promotion event, but was genuinely interested in exploring how young people of today think about him and his "Wall Jumper" 27 years after its publication. Thus, a lively discussion with the students ensued, during which the author did not mince matters and exclaimed "those who are not struggling against the unbearable, live the wrong way".

European Dimension

With Demetrio Volcic one of the great Italian European television journalists as well as a cosmopolitan paid a visit to our school on the 21st January 2010. His live coverage from the Red Square in Moscow, his work as a correspondent in Prague, Vienna and finally in Bonn during the days of the downfall of the Wall and the reunification were real journalistic classics! Volcic explained to the students in a confident, friendly and comprehensible manner the events before and after the fall of the Iron Curtain. Later he answered all their questions. The extent to which the Italian language section had prepared for the meeting with Volcic became apparent during the evening event. The Europahalle was crowded and even the Italian ambassador was present.

The Hungarian journalist and historian Andrew Oplatka held a lecture and presented his latest book, "The First Crack in the Wall" (2009) on the 3rd February 2010. Oplatka was born and spent his childhood in Budapest. As a 14-year-old boy, just after the bloody defeat of the Hungarian uprising in 1956, he fled with his parents to the West. Between 1968 and 2004, he was a correspondent for the newspaper "Neue Zürcher Zeitung" in Stockholm, Paris, and Moscow and also in his home town Budapest. He now teaches as a historian at the universities of Vienna and Budapest. In his book he exposes the background to the events on the 11th September 1989 (!), when Hungary opened its Western border and officially allowed thousands of GDR citizens to flee to Austria. An exciting political thriller, which is just as brilliant as it is entertaining!

Tilo Schabert is a professor of political science at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg and visiting professor in Europe and overseas, and above all, has profound knowledge of the German-French relations and of the reunification process. He has probably been so far the only one who could break into the archives of the Elysée Palace. At the ESM, he talked about his standard work "How World Politics Is Made: France and the Reunification of Germany", which was published in German, French and English. In 1981, Mitterrand had predicted the German reunification in 15 years time while Chancellor Kohl was sceptical about it. However, as this prophecy seem to come true, he did not want a German "Sonderweg", but the continuation of the successful integration of a united German nation into the European Union, with clearly and finally defined borders. Schabert knew very well how to rivet the attention of young listeners by referring to the East Berlin concert of Bruce Springsteen and the West Berlin performance of Michael Jackson just before the end of the GDR.

The opening of the exhibition "It started in Gdansk" brought a prominent visitor to the European School Munich. The Consul General of the Republic of Poland in Munich, El?bieta Sobótka, who had already visited the ESM twice as part of the Fall-of-the-Wall Project, captured pupils' and teachers' attention by illustrating the extent of the German enthusiasm for Poland when the very young Polish refugee Frédéric Chopin's gave a stunning concert in Munich in 1831 on his way to Paris as well as the solidarity trade union's struggle for freedom. Anna Buchmann, the Director of the Polish Museum in Rapperswil, had specially travelled from Zurich to explain, by reference to the Solidarity exhibition, the theme of the National Museum "Magna res libertas" (freedom is a great thing), which was founded in exile in 1870 in Switzerland. With great personal commitment, the ESM Parents' Association's representative, Georg Weber, recalled the crucial role of Poland in the epoch defining changes in Europe in 1989.

Final Chords

David Buckley, who as a biographer of the pop icon David Bowie teaches Cultural Studies in Britain and at the Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich, held two lectures at the ESM. On the 4th March 2010 to English mother tongue students and then on the 11th March 2010 to those studying English as a second language. In both lectures he talked about the impact of the Wall and the Iron Curtain on contemporary pop music and the youth cultural scene. The Secondary School students were all ears as Buckley was adept in both skilfully and casually combining humour with academic analysis to present the material. A cool professor! Thus, Buckley not only succeeded in presenting a serious issue, but also in truly engaging the young audience emotionally and intellectually. Perhaps the students still do not know whether there is life on Mars, as Bowie suggests in one of his famous songs, however, they surely have a much clearer picture of very recent political upheavals and the far-reaching significance of the Wall and its downfall.

On the 18th March 2010, the last Spanish ambassador of the German Democratic Republic (GDR) brought the long Munich winter to an end with his uplifting lecture at the ESM. Alonso Alvarez de Toledo explained to Secondary School students from years 5, 6 and 7, how a ghastly November day quite unexpectedly unleashed spring feelings among the residents of East and West Berlin in 1989. Accompanied by the current Spanish Consul General, Don Enrique Iranzo, Toledo, the former diplomat and the Spanish King's former chief of protocol, had brought along historical evidence: his personal State Security Service (Stasi) file and a videotape of that unforgettable night that changed the course of history. As a personal present, he gave the film clip to the European School Munich. Mesmerised, the students followed the description of this talented narrator, who smoothly switched from Spanish to English in order to enter more rapidly into a discussion with the audience.

On the 12th April 2010, the French writer Sylvie Germain presented her novel "Toby des marais", which was published in 1998 and which had been covered in class in preparation of the Baccalaureate in all European Schools. Inspired by a fascinating biblical episode of the Ancient Testament, "The Book of Tobit", Sylvie Germain rewrote the picaresque tale of the eponymous character. Sylvie Germain had travelled to many Eastern countries and spent many years as a teacher in Prague, witnessing first-hand the oppression and surveillance on the part of the Stalinist government. Consequently, she was deeply moved by the air accident of the Polish President on the way to the commemoration of the massacre at Katyn, in which the Soviets and parts of the Polish elite were murdered in 1940.

The young Director of the Cervantes Spanish Institute in Munich, Dr Ibon Zubiaur, is a graduate in psychology from the Spanish Basque Province who also plays the piano. Having learned Basque, Spanish and English at an early age, he became a lecturer in literature in Tübingen and in Lublin (Poland) and now works part time as a writer as well as a translator of German literature into Spanish, which was of particular interest for the event at the ESM. On the 29th April 2010, Ibon Zubiaur talked about two publications from GDR authors who had become dear to him: "Geschwister" ("Brothers and Sisters") by Brigitte Reimann and "Gauklerlegende" ("The Legend of the Juggler") by Irmtraud Morgner. In his fourth foreign language - German - he confessed in a remarkably eloquent manner that he had immediately fallen in love with Brigitte Reimann, whom he knew only from photos. He then explained frankly that he had also become equally taken with Irmtraud Morgner's writing style. Zubiaur demonstrated the similarities between the lives of these two authors, who were both born in 1931 and who both displayed zest and optimism for life as well as solidarity with the GDR, despite harbouring criticism and experiencing suffering at the very hands of that regime. Both of them died of cancer, but arguably also of disappointment about a state which had destroyed all illusions about a humane form of socialism.

On the 17th May 2010, in a dialogue with Jesuit Father Christof Wolf, who not only experienced the GDR first hand, but also addressed this topic as a film director and head of the media company Loyola Productions, the Metropolitan Augoustinos talked about his childhood in German-occupied Greece and explained how a German student studying German literature got him interested in her home country and her mother-tongue during his theological studies in Istanbul. He continued to explain how intense his decade-long connection to Germany has been ever since, which naturally led him to talk about his time as a chaplain in the divided Berlin. Were religious funerals actually held in East Berlin? Yes, in the car in front of the cemetery! Russian officers invited the Greek Orthodox clergy (and not the Russian one!) to the christening of their children in their homes. However, during the celebration that followed the christening they were not allowed to discuss this. In a particularly vehement manner both the Metropolitan Augoustinos and Christof Wolf advocated an ethical and moral identity for Europe, which is supposed to be both fascinating and powerful in its diversity and should not be limited to a single currency as a common denominator. Such a plea met the full approval of the European audience present, as the thunderous applause proved. After the discussion, the ESM students gathered around the Metropolitan Augoustinos, who was dressed in a dignified black robe, while Father Wolf was dressed in a more casual manner.

On the 28th June 2010, the photo exhibition "Beyond the Wall" from Augusto Bordatos in the Europabau building brought the project to a preliminary close. The artist served in the Italian Embassy in East Berlin during the 89s as a press officer and captured images and impressions before and after the fall of the "Wall". These photos were no volatile snapshots that would soon vanish into oblivion or were produced for the hype of the moment and published for a temporary existence on the Internet, but enduring black-and-white sepia toned images. One depicted a police officer, who leans against the crumbling wall - lost in thought - while looking into a gloomy future, seems to sense - as his gaze suggests - that his time would soon come to an end. Another picture depicted an infinitely long bridge over the Elbe River, which seems to be built for eternity with many solid pillars, however, abruptly stops in the middle of the current.

On the 29th November 2010, the historian Joseph Škrábek from Prague gave a lively and detailed account of the history of Bohemia and the development of the Czech-German relations. According to Škrábek, fanatical mindsets, such as "people need delusions", have far too long marked and put a strain on the relations between Czechs and Germans. Škrábek wrote a book about the history of German-Czech relations ("V?erejší starch" / "Yesterday's Fear"), first in Czech and then in German. Perhaps, as the historian suggested, the ban on publishing a new edition of the German version of his book could be seen as evidence that the previously strained relations between the two nations have meanwhile become reconciled, allowing for a peaceful friendship to be developed under the European Union. Compared to the previous existence-threatening tensions, today's "boredom" between neighbouring nations in Europe is rather a good sign for Škrábek. Josef Škrábek ended his presentation by emphasising his commitment to Europe and clearly taking his distance to the position of the current anti-Europe Czech President and in line with the great Czech poet, dissident and former president Vaclav Havel.

On St. Nicholas Day, the music of Chopin emanated from the Europahalle. As a conclusion of both Chopin's anniversary year and the ESM mega project "Europe 20 Years after the Fall of the Wall", the cultural centre "jour fixe muenchen.de" paid tribute to the 200th anniversary of the still very popular musical genius. The Munich composer Jon Michael Winkler adapted Chopin waltzes, etudes and polonaises for the classical guitar as part of a production commissioned by the Polish Cultural Centre Munich. The performance, held on the 6th December 2010, was a musical thank you for this unusual school project that brought together all parts of Europe; East and West, North and South. The passionate and equally melancholy music, which Chopin composed for the piano, was remarkably convincing on the guitar. However, this required sound technique and skilful playing of the chord polyphony in order to emulate the full piano sound.

For instance, the revolutionary etude in C minor Opus 10 No. 12 demands a superior left-hand playing technique for very fast passages, while the right hand - the other guitarist, which is - builds up the tension with dotted rhythms. The guitarists Jon Michael Winkler and Alexander Stohr achieved this challenge masterfully. Gaby Dos Santos, a former student of the European School in Varese, created a special atmosphere by putting stories to the music. The Polish Consul Dr. Gra?yna Strzelecka quite rightly pointed out that one does not necessarily need to listen to a piano concert to understand Chopin's virtuosity; the sound of guitars accomplishes the purpose equally well. Consequently, the soft guitar sound and the world famous melodies did not fail to impress the young audience. After the final chord faded away, none of the 250 guests wanted to get up first. Instead, they would have preferred to let themselves get carried away a little longer.

The film that had been made by the students in May 2010 proves that students, teachers, staff, parents, interviewed at random while walking in the school building - all had either taken notice or had actively been attending the events of the Fall of Wall Project. A great audience rating!

Conclusion

On the 18th March 2011, two-year-long "Fall of the Wall" Project was brought to a final close with a film premiere at the Polish Consulate General in Munich. When the invitees from the European School Munich reached the Polish Consulate General it was raining heavily. However, before they had a chance to cheerfully start singing the song "Singing in the Rain" in front of the closed gate, the door opened with a friendly "Dzie? dobry" and the ESM guests could already hear Chopin etudes, played by Maestro Wolfgang Leibnitz, a "veteran" of the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra, emanating from the ballroom. Almost everyone had come. Consul General El?bieta Sobótka welcomed her Spanish counterpart Enrique Iranzo Arqués and Ibon Zubiaur, the Director of the Instituto Cervantes as well as Augusto Bordato, the Representatives of the Italian Embassy. The event at the Polish Consulate General coincided with the 150th anniversary of the founding of Italy. The complete management of the European School Munich had also come to see the premiere of the project's film "Europe 20 Years After the Fall of the Wall": Rudolph Ensing, André Studer, Fausta Pressacco and Gerry van Woensel, Representative of the Board of ESM Parents' Association, the main sponsor of the Fall of the Wall project, as well as the project's coordinator Roland Jerzewski and the film director María Ortiz Ostalé. Many teachers and pupils of the ESM were also present. Even the Chairman of the German-Polish Society in Munich, Werner Meier, and Nina Koslowski, the translator from the Polish Museum in Rapperswil Helvetic, had spared no trouble to make their way to this film premiere.

El?bieta Sobótka spoke highly about the Fall of the Wall Project of the European School Munich as she considered it an evidence of that "the European consciousness has reached young people, particularly important in regard to the fact that they will eventually shape our continent's future". In Rudolph Ensing's view, the project's theme has never been about the past, but is still relevant to understanding today's Europe. Enrique Iranzo recalled his unforgettable Fall of the Wall experiences when he - as a diplomat - was transferred from East Berlin to the West and was able to cross the border of two politically very different regions simply by buying a metro ticket. Augusto Bordato, who had also been a diplomat in divided Berlin, had taken photographs during the historic moment between division and unity. Gerry van Woensel finally commended the project coordinators on accomplishing the task in such a professional manner, enabling the students to gain insights into fairly contemporary historical upheavals and capturing their imagination.

A film version of the project had not been planned from the start. However, in the course of these one and a half years - the duration of the project - more than 1000 photos were taken and 15 hours of film sequences were shot, these included random snapshots, mobile phone and video recordings. Thanks to Maria Ortiz, this diverse material has now become a remarkable film kaleidoscope, the cinematic story of a successful common project, in which guest speakers from around Europe visited our school and in which so many parents, teachers, students, both from the primary and Secondary School, the librarians, the administrative and technical staff, but also other well-known people from Munich participated. The film very clearly impressed the audience and revived the feeling of European solidarity that emerged during the course of the project in school year 2009/2010. A very good example of sustainability!

A key factor for the success was the cooperation with the many language sections and classes, both in the primary and the Secondary School as well as with both libraries, the technical staff, but also the support of the school management, the efforts and commitment of all volunteers, consisting of colleagues and students, the support of the Parents' Association - which in particular had provided generous financial support, without which the project would not have been able to succeed. In addition, the available resources of the school, the successful acquisition of external funding, especially the generous support of the diplomatic representations of Italy, Poland, Spain and Hungary. Finally, the active and often emphatic contributions of our key stakeholders, the students, have all contributed to the success of the project. The film about the fall of the Wall Project is almost finished. Many events are documented and the DVD can be used in class. It is also available to everyone interested. Everyone involved in the fall of the Wall Project is listed on the project's website.

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